✍🏻 Professor Romance’s 4 1/2 ⭐️ Review: Tia Louise’s Twist of Fate ✍🏻

Overall Grade: ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ 1/2

“We’re not in control of anything, but if we do our best and act with pure motives, somehow it all turns out right.”

Life is about choices. Maybe those choices are good or maybe they are bad, but they ultimately lead us to develop some level of character, some sense of self. In Tia Louise’s Twist of Fate, her newest book, Scout, her hero, and Daisy, her heroine, make choices that, at some point, lead them away from each other, but life in a romance story has a way of becoming righted in the best ways possible. Tia Louise has this ability to write stories, usually set in small towns, that you can’t help but adore. Twist of Fate definitely follows in this tradition. While it is a standalone story, you should read This Much Is True to gain a bit more footing in this book. You don’t need to read it, but it will make you appreciate this story even more, as it’s the first time we meet Scout since that book revolves around Scout’s brother, J.R. In looking at these two books, honestly, I like Twist of Fate a bit more than its predecessor, and much of that has to do with the characterization of Scout. 

In TMIT, Scout is a treat. He’s the light to his brother’s dark, so Louise uses him to bring levity to J.R.’s story. If Scout didn’t exist in that story, I think it would be a much darker book, even though the heroine of that book has the same lightness as Scout. But there is a charisma and charm to Scout that woos you. You find this in full force in Twist of Fate. Scout charms the pants off of Daisy, her heroine, along with Tia Louise’s readers. You can’t help but love him even when he’s leaving Daisy. 

Add to Twist of Fate a heroine like Daisy, and they are a golden couple. While there are moments when you wish them together, Louise is smart in keeping them apart so she can allow them to follow their dreams. This is meant to interrogate the idea of living one’s dreams. The dreams we hold in our youth are often very different when we are a bit older, and Louise makes this abundantly clear through Daisy and Scout’s journeys. Even after their absence, Louise doesn’t make you work for their reconciliation. As these two individuals are good-natured, she allows their relationship to be the same. There is a comfort in that, as a reader, because this book isn’t meant to torment you as many second chance romances do. 

So why should you really choose to read this book beyond the fact that Tia Louise wrote it? Here’s a list of the ancillary reasons that this book is a delight:

*Olivia Newton-John is this book’s spirit animal.

*I didn’t think anyone could outshine Scout’s jocularity, but his daughter, Melody, is the true light of this story. What’s not to love about a quarterback princess!

*There is a scene in this book that reads very close to Practical Magic…and besties turning spells is the allusion you didn’t know you needed. 

*A snooty boss who is getting his own book next

*Scout’s grandmother who is the wizened sage of this book and This Much Is True. She is equal parts wise and blunt, which makes for meaningful, yet hilarious moments. 

So…should you make the choice to read Tia Louise’s newest book, Twist of Fate? Absolutely! As Scout’s grandmother says, “‘there are no wrong choices here, but you’re going to have to decide.’” When it comes to Tia Louise and her stories, you won’t regret the choice to read this book of a second chance, soulmate kind of love.

In love and romance, 

Professor A

Author:

I teach students to write for college. I love to read writers who write romance. Why not review and promote the writing of people who love to write romance? Win-win for me

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