✍🏻 Professor Romance’s 4 ⭐️ Review: Karen Frances’s Collision ✍🏻

Overall Grade: ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️

Karen Frances’s newest book, Collision, a book situated in K. Bromberg’s Driven World, is an insta-love, angsty romance that revs your engine. Frances is a new writer to me, as well as K. Bromberg. Given that I am new to both of these ladies but intrigued by the universe being curated by K. Bromberg, I opted to read this book simply because its qualities piqued my interest: playboy alpha-race car driver (I didn’t realize he was Scottish…SWOON!) hero, self-possessed, intelligent, articulate journalist heroine, and a meet-cute that sizzles. It seemed evident that there would be fireworks in Collision. For the most part, there were. 

One of my favorite aspects of this book is that it is set in the UK. The hero is a playboy-ish, fast-driving hero. Yet, he’s Scottish. You may wonder why that intrigues me. Well, I read books all the time, and most of the time, the setting is the US. Having traveled through Europe last summer, I always enjoy revisiting places where I traversed. Plus it’s always intriguing to gain experiences from other countries. Just seemed like a positive for Collision

Additionally, there is Insta-chemistry between Ellie and Ryan. From their first meeting, as I suspected, these two sizzle. It also creates one of the issues for me with this story. I know that fiction is imaginary. I get it. However, if an author makes the choice for the characters to fall instantly for each other, then I want it to feel believable. Ryan, an admitted playboy as Ellie’s purpose is to rehab his image through her writing piece on him, only has eyes for Ellie, and for most the book, I was curious why. Yes, Karen Frances offers up Ryan’s reasons, but I don’t believe them. Why her? While rehabbing his image, what piqued his interest in her that he wants her over other women? If a hero is promiscuous, I want to know what turns his head to a straight path. 

There’s some forbidden with this relationship. Given that Ellie is reporting on Ryan, that they fall for each other makes for some questionable journalistic ethics. That forbidden, however, ramps up their chemistry even more, making it burn brighter. 

This story is not linear at all. Belying Ryan and Ellie’s journey into a romantic relationship is a bigger story. This bigger story becomes emotional and adds a gravity to Frances’s romance. Ideas about family complicate the romance, and it creates additional fireworks in Collision.

Even more, one of the ancillary characters of the story, Felicity, is your preeminent Mean Girl, and her subterfuge adds another layer of drama to this journey. While we are not meant to like Felicity, without her, the forbidden aspects of this story would not exist, and the tension necessary in storytelling would be lost. 

Obviously, Karen Frances’s crafted connection with K. Bromberg’s Driven series in an overt way through Ryan’s burgeoning relationship with Colton and Rylee hits on feelings of nostalgia for Bromberg readers and illustrates Karen Frances’s ability to write within and outside of Bromberg’s universe in a meaningful way. While I haven’t read the Driven series, at no point did I feel lost when Colton and Rylee join the story. 

Karen Frances’s Collision is a fast-paced romance sure to speed your pulse. From Ryan and Ellie’s banter to their chemistry to their journey while challenged by outside issues, Frances makes it easy for us to turn the page. In the end, Collision finishes first at the finish line. If you love K. Bromberg, you will absolutely want to read this book. 

In love and romance,

Professor A

Author:

I teach students to write for college. I love to read writers who write romance. Why not review and promote the writing of people who love to write romance? Win-win for me

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